News & Events

The Sarahs and Serendipity on ABC's Radiotonic

The fantastic and wonderfully's creative Radiotonic, from ABC RN's Creative Audio Unit,  featured The Sarah Award's initial podcast Serendipity along with Rick Moody's piece "Designer Heartbeats." Have a listen to the show here.

Enter our Very, Very, Short, Short Stories Contest!

In celebration of The Sarahs’ website launch, we invite you to participate in our first annual Very, Very, Short, Short Stories Contest. We asked Sarah Lawrence College writing faculty to provide sentences to inspire you to make inventive mini audio fiction. Learn more about it here. Deadline is October 1, 2015. You may enter as many times as you like. The winner receives $100 and a license for Hindenburg Journalist Pro editing software.

Latest

Very, Very, Short, Short Stories Finalists (Part 1)

Serendipity Ep 17:

Very, Very, Short, Short Stories Finalists (Part 1)

In this episode of Serendipity, we play 5 of the 10 finalists for our 2016 Very, Very, Short, Short Stories Contest. Featuring: "Bitterly Cold" by David Garland, "The Staging Area" by Jason Gots, "Noir" by Pa Ying Vang, "#blessed" by Jackie Heltz, and "Blinking" by La Cosa Preziosa. Read More

Towards a Poetics of Audio: The Importance of Criticism

Essays

Towards a Poetics of Audio: The Importance of Criticism

It is an exciting time for audio. The tumultuous growth of podcasting and the concomitant development of digital channels, multiple platforms, and user-driven content has not only expanded and re-energized the form, but forced public radio to loosen its stays and let down its hair.Where once we might have talked of “the system” or “the industry,” we can now confidently say we are part of “a culture.” But—we are missing two important components of a vital culture: a critical language, and with it, a critical practice. The language should be expressly designed to describe our forms, tropes, and themes, but with reference to the larger culture and world of ideas. And the practice should be constant, robust, and open, with critical tools wielded to help us better understand our work, and ourselves, and to help our public to better understand us as artists. Read More

Getting On with James Urbaniak

Reviews

Getting On with James Urbaniak

James Urbaniak is the kind of podcaster that other producers love to hate. His show, Getting On with James Urbaniak, consists of nothing but a single voice reading a fictional soliloquy, often written by someone else. There is almost no elaborate soundscaping, no intricate plot development, little evidence of endless editing sessions to get the thing just right. Getting On sounds like Urbaniak cruised into the studio, an iced latte in hand, and finished recording before his drink grew tepid. None of this would be infuriating if the podcast in question wasn’t so good. Read More